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20130125
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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
of beyond the benghazi incident. i think there's been a dearth of discussion around foreign policy, and in some part that's due because the republicans themselves don't have -- have not verbalized or outlined a foreign policy agenda that's measurably different from that which the president is pursuing. i want to draw your attention to an article in the boston globe, an op ed that says basically the idea of a foreign policy doctrine is outmoded. grand strategies are overrated. they are no more likely to guide this nation to noble he was than painful ones. intervention is fervor, no matter the reason, tends to reflect not reality, but advocacy by people with agendas. one of the issues right now is that the president faces a number of shifting puzzle pieces around the globe. does that, in effect, mean that there cannot be an obama doctrine that applies globally? >> i think it's always helpful for a president and an administration to have a foreign policy and a philosophy about how to approach foreign policy, but you are right that even the greatest enunciation of strategy can be impac
relations committee, i think a great deal of what good foreign policy about is building personal relationships and building personal relationships with leaders around the world. and the one thing that i've really observed, senator kerry, of you is that you have done that. and we have had so many of these private meetings across over there in the capitol and in the small foreign relations room and i could just feel with meeting with all these leaders, the tremendous respect that they have for you and the ability you are going to have to build on that to make an excellent secretary of state. so i'm very excited about this opportunity for you and i want, in my first question here i wanted to focus on mexico and central america. during the last decade, relations between the united states and mexico have strengthened as a result of our shared security goals relating to the initiative. and one of the pillars of that initiative includes judicial reform and you know this very well. however, the federal government and many of the mexican states have yet to pass legislation which would cha
attack. joining us now, danielle pletka, vice president foreign policy and defense studies, defense policy studies, i should say, at the american enterprise institute. danielle, thanks for being with us. you wrote a column this week in which your first words were it's hard to like john kerry? [laughter] >> well, i worked for ten years up at the senate foreign relations committee when senator kerry wasn't the chairman, he was one of the other members of the committee. he's just not that popular on capitol hill. he hasn't worked well with other members. that was one of the problems he had when he ran for president. he's perceived as being stand offish, as being uninterested in their issues and in being kind of doctrinaire on policy. jon: but bob corker, the new mexico senator -- we're going to be talking to him next hour -- had glowing words for senator kerry in the hearing this morning. >> every senator walks into a hearing with another senator who's been nominated for something thinking there but for the grace of god go i. it's a collegial institution, but the collegiality is about
on foreign policy and and domestic issues. the obama doctrine calls for ending america's wars, avoiding future ones and nationbuilding here at home. good ideas all. but, mishandled, they could signal a retreat from washington's global leadership. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations the united states had, compare that with today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington's generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed
or foreign policy, the challenge is to overcome those obstacles that the political culture place in front of them. host: a call from cincinnati, ohio. caller: in a country where originally white people were not even citizens of this country and now we have a black president, i think we've come a long way. i feel that president obama has not done enough for either side. i think in the beginning it was an issue for him. now he's just like, i am going to be the president. but there are still people who cannot get past that. how does that affect his second term? i have to say, particularly republicans -- how do we get people over the issue of his race? guest: the sad reality is, there are some people that -- i do not think we want to make the mistake of exaggerating their numbers -- there are some people for whom they will never get over the issue of race. there are other people who quite sincerely, for reasons having nothing to do with race, believe that the president's agenda, in their estimation, is too fill-in-the-blank. the larger issue is how we create a political process in which any p
should be our foreign policy, keeping gadhafi empower, is that four or in opposition to american interests? i don't get them as issues' notebook. those are policy issues. i'm mainly concerned with regime issues. but you take your point, i am making a distinction between the democratic sovereignty and so i guess they don't have an objection to the overthrow of the burmese government. it would have an objection is a policy, i don't think to be a good policy to change every country in the world i am not advocating not in any sense. we can argue about different policies. i'm saying is a form of government, the liberal democratic nationstate is superior to other forms of government. one would be global governance. others isn't autocratic regime. i talk about russia and china has autocratic regimes than i do see any problem pushiness countries in a democratic direction, not by force, the public affairs and so on would be an acceptable policy. we could do it or not do it is a policy decision. of course there is radical islam, which establishes sharia as the constitutional structure and
once, he barely mentions economic growth or the private sector. think about foreign policy. he doesn't mention terrorism, jihaddism. a decade of war is ending. has anyone told the jihadists in algeria or the taliban in afghanistan? he didn't mention afghanistan, he didn't mention iran. how many times in his first term did president obama try to establish his bona fides as a tough guy by saying he would not let iran get nuclear weapons? not a word about it and, indeed, almost the opposite, that engage empty's the way -- engagement's the way to handle problem abroad. jon: we are heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends. >> it really struck me. two things about it. first of all, we would not have won the peace of after world war ii if we hadn't win the wore. he got out of iraq, he's getting us out of afghanistan or, he seems not to want to confront jihadists or the iranian regime, so the idea you can win a peace without winning the war is delusional. but also that sentence, in particular he says they didn't just win the wa
. the important foreign-policy issue of benghazi. it was something we were talking about a month ago, but it faded into the background. everybody will be watching tomorrow. it is a big deal to have the secretary of state come in. everyone wants to hear what she has to say about this. she becomes less of a focus because she's leaving, some say. but it will be really important hearing. the group publicans' want a special committee formed to investigate the because the issue, but they did not get that. all we will crb hearings where we get a picture of it from people who were heading the operation. so her parents will be very big tomorrow. guest: more broadly, on national security, we will enter the beginning of confirmation hearings for john kerry as secretary of state, chuck hagel as secretary of defense. consideration of our military strategy, our military spending, how we project american power as we complete a winding down of the war in afghanistan. it is really going to be the end of a post-9/11 period in national security policy, with the policy going for it from there still unsettled. guest:
're also entering into a new age of some beg decision in foreign policy because this country right now is starting to get some adversaries around the world because of our drone policy. that was not the situation four years ago. so this is -- our foreign policy is going to be judged on just how aggressive we get with that, and there's a growing concern in the community across the country about the drone attacks. just how many innocent people are we killing? there's been concerted conversation about we have to reel this in, and president obama, i think, is going to hear a great deal about that when it comes to foreign policy coming up here in the coming months. just how aggressive are we going to get? >> that specific reference that we should not be in a state of perpetual war. >> we are, and it's a different kind of war. >> i mean, that's the -- legally that's the justification that they cite for saying why it is that we can kill people in places where we're technically not waging some sort of war. that there is a global war still underway, and the authorization of using military force
justice. dr. king was a fierce critic of foreign policy in the vietnam war. in his beyond vietnam speech, which he delivered at the york's riverside church, 1967, a year before the day he was assassinated, dr. king calledll the united states the greatest purveyor of violence in the world today. "time" magazine called the speech demagogic slander that sounded like a script for radio hanoi. today, we let you decide. we play an excerpt of dr. king's speech, beyond vietnam. >> after 1954, they watched us conspire to prevent elections which could have surely brought ho chi minh to power over the united vietnam and they realized they had been did -- betrayed again. when we asked why they do not leap to negotiate, these things must be remembered. also it must be clear that the leaders of hanoi considered the presence of american troops in support of the diem regime to have been the initial military breach of the geneva agreements concerning foreign troops. and they remind us that they did not begin to send troops in large numbers and even supplies, and to the south, until american forces had mo
. a couple of things we haven't heard, creation of jockbs and what's happening in north africa and foreign policy, at least not yet. where should they make a move? >> if the president is true to his word, he needs to do something about the economy, about job creation. there are more unemployed or underemployed people in this country today than there were when the president first took office. we've seen a 33% increase in spending on welfare programs. the african-american unemployment rate in this country is double the national average. and nothing that the president is talking about right now seems to be geared toward putting those people back to work. >> i want to put some numbers on the screen right now, it's fox news polling that's new and how the people feel about the president now compared with four years ago. 47% disapprove, compared with 16% four years ago and look at the flip-flop in terms of those who approve there on the screen, and 47-65%, the jobs that you're talking about, maybe point a little to that, but there are other things that you've written about in a column. >> absolut
of how progressive this message was is the foreign policy piece. advocating for engagement against the backdrop of a hostage situation in algeria is a very firm flag to plant in the ground. to say that as we see al qaeda cells multiplying, taking over a host of failed states in north africa and now west africa. to say these are not our enemies, that we can come in peace, that we can have peaceable relations with evil actors in the world is very much obama 1.0. for him to say that now i thought was really, really remarkable if you're talking about hawk versus dove, progressive versus conservative. >> i thought that was a direct message to the mullahs and to the people of iran. i spent some time with one family this week. i think he knows that the worst case scenario is war, it always is the worst case scenario and he's hoping somehow we can stop them from weaponizing. >> but chris -- >> nuclear weapons. >> i think this was a forthrightly liberal speech. i think that -- >> you're an eight. >> he said we are a country that doesn't -- that believes that every citizen deserves a decent
some key lines that might be a sign of what's to come in his second term foreign policy. let's listen to a bit of what the president said yesterday. >> we, the people, still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. our citizens seared by the memory of those we have lost know too well the price that is paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm, but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war, who turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends, and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will show the courage to try and resolve our differences with other nations peacefully, not because we are naive about the dangers we face, but because engagement can more durably lift suspicion and fear. >> that's what i like about president obama and one of the many reasons i like him, because of that. could that be an olive branch the president might extend to nations such as, let's say it, iran, and if so, will they respond in tehran? richard engel is
at the president pulls a second term, this focusing on foreign policy and thand domestic issues. the president is facing a $16, $17 trillion debt. he is facing a pullout from afghanistan and our role in the world. guest: it is interesting. leadership, what does that mean. if you go back on the eve of the world war, the number of foreign military installations united compare that with, today. it was well under 100. the cold war has had an enormous transforming impact. dwight eisenhower cited all of this in his famous farewell address. i think there is a legitimate debate to be had over what is -- that is as old as the republic. washington post generation believed united states would be an asylum for the world also oppressed. -- world's oppressed. it was a place to which victims could come and enjoy the fruits of liberty. there was no sense that we were going to impose our vision or values on the rest of the world. host: this question, in case you missed earlier. why is the president having two swearing-in ceremonies? according to the inaugural committee, it has happened on six previous occasion
him look bad on foreign policy, he's going to hold out as long as he can and say, look, everybody behave themselves and play nice with me and at the end maybe i'll let you have the big list. >> megyn: and he'll try to withstand the pressure to make an endorsement as long as possible. i don't know, i think it's tougher when one of the people is the man you selected as your vice-president. yes, she's secretary of state, but vice-president, air telling the world, he could be president. i'm telling you, feel comfortable with the thought of him being president, god forbid anything happens to me and tougher to turn around and say, actually i liked her better. (laughter) >> he'll have to hope that joe biden will hold off longer. >> megyn: we'll find out. thanks, chris. >> you bet. >> megyn: we're learning more today about a new pentagon plan that lifts the ban on women in combat. wow, this turned out to be controversial. getting a lot of strong reaction to this and up next, we'll have some new concerns with the debate. and arrest and murder from the city of brotherly love, the frighteni
the president issued a memorandum instructing more engagement in foreign policy around lgbt people. this is having humongous impact. >> humongous impact. >> all over the world and real life saving important things. we need that engagement to continue. >> yeah. >> we need all the work that's going on around health care, which is so important to all americans. you know, the medicaid expansion thing that we talk about a lot in terms of other populations for transgender people it is hugely important. so many of us have been impover shed. >> many americans aren't aware of it. they understand we have a set of protections on if you are a woman, a set of protections on your religion. i don't think many people realize in this country, if you are a transgender woman or a transgender man or gay or lesbian, you can lose your job in many states in this country. >> there's been legislation on it since 1974. it's been discussed in congress. we do not have this. it's something the president can put his weight behind and push for as well. there's something else i want to mention. california passed
of the puzzle? >> that reminds me when i was in graduate school i went to study foreign policy and was right around the time they balanced the budget and i thought my gosh what am i going to do? so i realized the long-term problems were still there and i had to make a choice whether social security or health care and it was easy, social security is easy supply jumped into becoming a social security expert because health care is so hard. they're really is no other issue at the core of all of this. we don't know the answers and the best thing that we can do right now is putting in place as many different attempts to control health care costs and evaluating what works so we don't with a fork or not we've seen the costs coming down, and that could be in anticipation that could be temporary and permanent, so it's better data gathering the intra-asian, analyzing it and then figuring out what's working and doing more of that. one of the important things that happened in the changes that were just made or the exchanges on health care. it does give you the room to put an increase in the medicare ag w
on foreign policy and other sort of legacy goals that don't require congress because congress' attention is elsewhere. >> somehow i think that we're going to blink and it's already going to be moving on to the 2016 cycle. john, thanks. >> you bet. >> tomorrow on "today," we're live in washington with coverage of president obama's second inauguration. we hope you'll join us for that. once again, lester? >> roadtrip. thanks. >>> still reeling from repeated sex scandals, the u.s. air force has released a report revealing hundreds of instances of pornography on its bases. the investigation was spurred by a female sergeant who risked her career by stepping forward. here's our national investigative report. >> reporter: at mcdill air force base in tampa, wright air force base in ohio, and more than 100 bases around the world, new orders -- search and destroy pornography. >> the first thing that i knew that i saw was this picture here with the breasts. it says, "how do all fighter pilot songs start?" >> reporter: technical sergeant jennifer smith serves at the elites f-16 squadron in south caro
and currently oversees the u.s. bishops' outreach and service. he is an expert in foreign policy. ambassador comment thank you for joining us. >> -- ambassador, thank you for joining us. >> thank you for the extra ambassadorship. i only had four. forum.d like to thank the 4 i would also like to thank all of the other members of the panel for their contributions. i am here to represent the u.s. conference of catholic bishops. it is known sometimes by the u.s.ccb. the conference has been engaged in this issue for decades. we look forward to this debate and urge our elected officials not to lose this opportunity to reform a broken system. there are several areas the bishops will focus upon in this debate. first, there must be an automatic task -- path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented. we cannot and must not fall short of citizenship for the undocumented. where they receive legal status but no chance to become americans. we should not sanction a permanent underclass in this society without the full rights that other americans possess. we have been down that road before and with dis
-- but love, at the center of our public policy, it is a foreign concept. that is exactly what martin did. he put love at the center of the public square. why have we abandoned that notion? >> the rule of money. everybody and everything is up for sale. you cannot have integrity, love, you cannot have trust if everything and everybody is up for sale. if your leaders are up for sale, they will talk one way, get inside, and do something else. it is big money. for black people who have been hated for 400 years, institutionalized hatred coming after us, and we dish out martin king, that love in the face of the hatred, that is a spiritual and moral high ground. the whole country has to take note of it with martin. the whole world has to take note of it. that is what is weak and feeble. it is not a question of skin pigmentation. it is a question of equality and morality of your spirituality. all of us fall short. [applause] >> now it is competition. the president takes no child left behind, which is the worst education law in my lifetime -- [applause] straight out of charles dickens. train them for
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)